Individuals

Japan Society Winter Staff Picks: Recipes

With the changing of the seasons comes a time for nostalgia, festivities and celebration—what better way to celebrate these changes than with food! From baked oatmeal to hotpot recipes, finger foods to lunchbox ideas, Japan Society staff members share their favorite recipes to accompany the colder months.

Main Dishes:
Kabocha Eggplant Curry
Vegetarian Sushi Rice Pizza
Chanko Nabe
Houtou
Chicken Teriyaki over Rice
Grilled Chicken with Peanut Sauce over Rice
Side Dishes:
Goya and Tuna Salad
Goya Chanpuru
Tonjiru Soup
Miso-Sriracha Devilled Eggs


 
Sweets:
Matcha Marshmallows
Matcha Mille Crepe
Roasted Mango and Coconut Rice Pudding (Sombi)
Baked Oatmeal

MAIN DISHES


Kabocha Eggplant Curry

Japanese comfort food at its finest. Leftovers for breakfast with buttered toast remind me of chilly winter mornings with my whole family around. The kabocha and eggplant, particularly with chicken thigh, make a nice change from typical beef curry.
–Japan Society Staff Member
View the recipe here.
 

Vegetarian Sushi Rice Pizza

I’m very fortunate to have a friend whose career as a Personal/Chef Assistant has exposed me to brilliant food recipes. She’s such a good friend that she started experimenting with vegetarian recipes when she found out I stopped eating meat. The sushi rice vegetarian pizza that she made for me was one of my favorite food experiences. I am one happy guinea pig.
–Manuel Martinez, Finance
View the recipe here.
 

Chanko Nabe

This delicious hot pot dish is one of my favorite Japanese meals for winter. I first had it for lunch while visiting Ryogoku, Tokyo, an area famous for both sumo and chanko nabe. It’s eaten by sumo wrestlers to gain weight, but it’s actually quite healthy with lots of vegetables and protein– just don’t eat too much!
–Lydia Gulick, Development
View the recipe here.
 

Houtou


This dish is famous in Yamanashi Prefecture, and made only during the winter months. Throw everything you have in a big pot or nabe, add thick gooey noodles to the mix and you have a delightful dish that will warm you from the inside. In Japan where most homes are not centrally heated, this is the perfect way to spend time with family and friends–enjoy a regional dish and keep your family warm.
–Lana Kitcher, Development
View the recipe here
 

Chicken Teriyaki over Rice

This is of one my kids’ favorite lunch boxes. It’s easy to make whether for one person or for the entire family. This recipe is easy enough to make even in my very busy morning hours!
–Mie Igarashi, Development
View the recipe here.

Grilled Chicken with Peanut Sauce over Rice

Every time there is a family gathering, my grandfather will buy hundreds of sate ayam for us to feast on. Sate ayam is an Indonesian dish of grilled skewered chicken served in peanut sauce. This recipe is my one–meal take on the dish; easy to reheat and prep in advance. Best eaten with fish crackers or lentil chips over rice.
–Leonie Thebez, Development
View the recipe here.
 


SIDE DISHES


Goya and Tuna Salad

This is a wonderful and easy dish for those who don’t like to cook, want to use seasonal vegetables from Japan, and are hoping to get some healthy vegetables into their diet. Eat it plain or as a sandwich–it is a treat for all! (Be sure to soak the slices in salt beforehand. Goya is known to be very bitter!)
–Lana Kitcher, Development
View the recipe here.
 

Goya Chanpuru

Goya chanpuru is a distinctive dish from Okinawa, Japan’s tropical islands. It’s made with the bright green goya, an Okinawan gourd that is very healthy but can be bitter on its own. When mixed in to a stir fry like this, all the flavors meld together beautifully. I make this dish without pork for a vegetarian version and it’s still delicious!
–Anna Cabasso, Talks+
View the recipe here
 

Tonjiru Soup (Miso Soup with Pork and Vegetables)

Fall and winter are the perfect seasons to eat tonjiru soup. It's chock-full of healthy vegetables and pork, and it will warm you up from the inside out. I usually make a big pot of it for easy weekend meals. It's also my go-to dish when we have a small gathering of friends at our home. Typically it is made with a regular potato, but I like to use one regular potato and one sweet potato to balance out the flavors. For me, this dish conjures up memories of visiting a mountain temple in Nagano on a cold and snowy New Year's eve, and eating tonjiru afterwards at one of the many food vendors that line the streets.
–Maureen Kamata, Toyota Language Center
View the recipe here.
 

Finger Food: Miso-Sriracha Deviled Eggs

When I’m not planning events for Japan Society members, I enjoy entertaining at home. These two Asian-influenced dishes (miso-sriracha deviled eggs and matcha marshmallows) are always a hit among my Japan-centric circle of friends.

Nobody likes making deviled eggs, but everyone likes to eat them! This variation on the classic retro dish may be better than the original.
–Christy Jones, Development
View the recipe here.
 


SWEETS


Finger Food: Matcha Marshmallows

Although making homemade marshmallows can be a little intimidating (and messy), the result will be fluffy, delicious and better than any store-bought confection! Serve them on their own or in hot chocolate. Note: this recipe requires a candy thermometer and a standing mixer.
–Christy Jones, Development
View the recipe here.
 

Matcha Mille Crepe

The matcha mille crepe is a hybrid style with French and Japanese elements. The smooth cream, bitter matcha, and soft crepe combined together perfectly creates its unique flavor. When I was an undergraduate student in Japan, I could find this type of cake in almost every convenience store in Tokyo. Since they were cheap and delicious, I bought them often as a snack when I got hungry.
–Zhewen Jiang, Business & Policy
View the recipe here.

Roasted Mango and Coconut Rice Pudding (Sombi)

In 2012, Senegalese chef Pierre Thiam graciously took the challenge of creating the menu for Going Global!, a special international feast benefitting Japan Society’s Education and Family Programs. He integrated Asian ingredients into ten Senegalese dishes, one of which was the memorable and extraordinarily delicious Sombi (Roasted Mango over Coconut Rice Pudding “Sushi”). Check out his beautifully illustrated cookbook, Yolele! Recipes from the Heart of Senegal.
–Michiko Grasso, Development
View the recipe here.

Baked Oatmeal

This dish is a favorite around our home in the winter. At times, I will prepare the evening before and place in the fridge for a quick bake in the early morning with the aroma wafting through the apartment, it gets everyone up on those cold winter mornings. At other times, even our teenagers will make it and put their own twist on it with other fruits, nuts and occasionally chocolate or butterscotch chips. This is a crowd pleaser at all times and it’s great for leftovers. My favorite way of eating it is hot from the oven with cold milk in a bowl!
–Jeffrey Miller, Education & Family
View the recipe here.
 


All illustrations © Giulia Venturelli/Japan Society; Chanko nabe photo © Lydia Gulick/Japan Society; Houtou photo © Yuichi Sakuraba; Teriyaki photo © Mie Igarashi/Japan Society; Goya Champuru © Hajime Nakano; Deviled eggs © Christy Jones/Japan Society; Matcha marshmallows © Christy Jones/Japan Society; Matcha mille © Ashley Lim; Roasted mango and coconut rice pudding photo reprinted with permission from "Yolele! Recipes from the Heart of Senegal" by Pierre Thiam, copyright 2008, Lake Isle Press, Inc.



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