Media Fellows

Recipients and Essays

CURRENT FELLOWS



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    Robert Boynton

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2007-2008

    Robert S. Boynton is the director of NYU's magazine journalism program and author of The New New Journalism (2005). He has published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, Lingua Franca, The New Republic, The Nation, The Los Angeles Times Book Review, The Village Voice, Rolling Stone and many other publications. A selection of his work can be found at www.robertboynton.com. Boynton  graduated with a BA in Philosophy and Religion from Haverford College, and received an MA in Political Science from Yale University.

    Micah Fink

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2007-2008

    Micah Fink, founder of Common Good Productions, is an Emmy-nominated producer specializing in international affairs, public health, national security, and environmental issues. He has produced documentary films and special series for the last decade for PBS "Wide Angle," PBS "FRONTLINE," Thirteen/WNET, National Geographic Television and ABC News. From 2002-2005, Fink helped launch the PBS International News and Public Affairs series "Wide Angle" and supervised the finishing and broadcast of 15 documentaries. His freelance writing has appeared in many papers, websites and magazines, including: In These Times, The Multinational Monitor, The Washington City Paper, and The National Catholic Reporter. Fink earned a MA in Journalism from Columbia University and a BA in Comparative Literature from Cornell University. 

    Micah’s fellowship resulted in the production of a documentary, Japan’s About Face, for the PBS show Wide Angle. The documentary can be viewed here:
    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/episodes/japans-about-face/video-full-episode/1641/

    Dana Goodyear

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2007-2008

    Dana Goodyear is a Los Angeles-based staff writer for The New Yorker as well as an accomplished poet. After four years as a senior editor at The New Yorker, Goodyear became a full-time staff writer in January, 2007, and in July she started writing "Postcard from Los Angeles," a regular blog on The New Yorker's web site. Her subjects have ranged from the organic-lifestyle entrepreneur MaryJane Butters to a new archeological investigation into the fate of the Donner Party. Her criticism has been featured in publications such as The New York Times Book Review, The Los Angeles Times Book Review, Vogue, and Slate. In 2005, Goodyear published her first collection of poems, Honey and Junk (W.W. Norton). Goodyear graduated from Yale University.

    Read “I ♥ Novels”
    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/12/22/081222fa_fact_goodyear

    Barry Lynn

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2007-2008

    Barry C. Lynn is a business and political journalist, and an expert on global industrial systems, corporate organization, trade, energy, emerging technology, and the development of middle-income nations. He is the author of End of the Line: The Rise and Coming Fall of the Global Corporation (Doubleday, 2005), and has written for Harper’s Magazine, The Financial Times, Harvard Business Review, and The National Interest, among others. He is the former Executive Editor of Global Business Magazine, and a former reporter for the Associated Press and Agence France Presse, and appeared on National Public Radio, CNN’s Lou Dobbs Tonight, CBS, C-SPAN, and the BBC. As a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, Lynn writes about the political, economic, and business ramifications of industrial interdependence among nations.

    Larissa MacFarquhar

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2007-2008

    Larissa MacFarquhar is a staff writer at The New Yorker, writing long profiles, mostly of cultural figures such as the poet John Ashbery, filmmakers Michael Moore and Quentin Tarantino, federal judge Richard Prosner, linguist and political activist Noam Chomsky, and technology visionary George Gilder, among others. Before joining The New Yorker, MacFarquhar  served as senior editor at Lingua Franca and was an advisory editor at The Paris Review. She has published articles in Artforum, Details, The Nation, The New York Times Book Review, The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic, Slate, and Spy. MacFarquhar  graduated from Harvard University with a BA in Social Studies.

    SELECTED PAST FELLOWS



    Hideo Amma

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Hideo Amma is a Correspondent in the Foreign News Division of the Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK), which he joined in 1990. He was a Foreign Correspondent for NHK in the Vladivostok Bureau from l998-2001, during which he reported on the social, political and economic affairs of the Russian Far East and Mongolia and the influence of Islamic extremists in the former Soviet Union. Since returning to Tokyo in 2001, he continues to report on the region and has produced two highly regarded documentaries on the post 9/11 situation in Central Asia and New York. He speaks English and Russian. Amma graduated from Osaka University with a BA in Russian Affairs.

    Phoebe Eaton

    The United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Phoebe Eaton is currently a freelance editor and writer. Prior to working as a freelance journalist, she was Deputy Editor of Talk magazine, where her responsibilities ranged from developing magazine content to securing exclusive, deeply reported feature articles on the war with Afghanistan, Wall Street, crime and the day’s preeminent players in the media, TV, the arts, design, politics and Hollywood, and supervising entire special issues. Other editorial positions she has held include Executive Editor at Details magazine, which she helped to relaunch, and New York Magazine, where she served as Deputy Editor and Features Editor. Eaton is a graduate of the University of Chicago, where she earned a degree in English Literature.

    Juley Fulcher

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellowship
    2001-2002

    Juley Fulcher is Public Policy Director of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV), where she works on federal legislation and policies promoting the interests of battered women and their children, as well as public education and initiatives to reduce societal violence and oppression. Holding both a PhD in Psychology from Johns Hopkins University and a JD from Georgetown University, Dr. Fulcher was Visiting Professor at the Georgetown University Law Center Domestic Violence Clinic and is currently a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at Towson University.

    Read Juley Fulcher's Fellowship Report (PDF)

    Kumiki Gibson

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellows
    2002-2003

    Kumiki Gibson is a partner in the law firm of Williams & Connelly, LLP, in Washington, DC, where she represents clients in criminal and civil matters, and advises corporate clients on equal employment and other workplace issues. Previously, she served as Counsel to the Vice President (Al Gore), counseling the Vice President and his staff on legal matters, and serving as an advisor on a number of policy issues including economic development, affirmative action, regulatory reform and reinventing government efforts. Gibson has also worked at the Department of Justice and clerked for a U.S. District Court Judge. Gibson is a graduate of Harvard University and Northeastern University Law School.

    Mark Halperin

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    Mark Halperin, Political Director of ABC News since October 1997, is responsible for the planning and editorial content of all political news on the network and shows such as "World News Tonight with Peter Jennings," "This Week with George Stephanopoulous" and "Nightline," among others. He also regularly appears as a correspondent and political analyst on television and radio programs for ABC News and is a regular commentator on American politics for Fuji Television’s program "Inside America". He is also the founder and editor of “The Note,” an insider’s look at the American political landscape that appears daily on ABCNews.com. Halperin received a BA from Harvard University.

    Read "The Search for Safe Change"

    Ken Hanioka

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    Ken Hanioka is a Senior Writer for Nikkei Medical, a leading monthly medical journal, where he helped create a new evaluation formula for hospitals and cancer centers. The evaluation system influenced the development of a new cancer care strategy in Japan. He is also an Associate Professor in Tokyo University’s Health Care and Social Policy Leadership Program, where he established the first national program to train health care policy leaders. For four years (1999-2003), he was the CEO of the Japan Marrow Donor Program, where he established a new donor recruiting system and a system for undertaking quick donor searches. Hanioka has also raised ten million dollars for the organization.

    Kelly Jones

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Kelly Jones is Senior Associate Producer for "The Connection," an award-winning program that airs on National Public Radio (NPR). She is also a freelance writer whose articles and essays about food and travel have appeared in The Boston Globe, Yankee magazine, The Boston Phoenix, Salon.com and other publications. Prior to joining "The Connection," Jones was a founding Managing Editor of Foodline.com, a website that featured original writing about food, wine, spirits, chefs and restaurants. She was also an arts reporter for ABC affiliate WMUR TV and a freelance public radio producer. Jones received a BA in French and Economics from Wellesley College and attended the L’Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris.

    Maggie Jones

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    Maggie Jones is a freelance writer who contributes to The New York Times Magazine, Mother Jones Magazine, The Washington Post, Salon.com and Parenting Magazine, among others. She writes primarily about women, families and culture. Prior to becoming a freelance writer, Jones was a correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer for five years. She is the recipient of many awards, including a Journalism Fellowship in Child and Family and Policy at the University of Maryland, a Pew International Journalism Fellowship and a Sundance Institute Writing Fellowship. Jones holds a BA in American Studies from Vassar College.

    Read "Shutting Themselves In"

    Keijiro Kawakami

    The United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Keijiro Kawakami is the evening news director at the Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) News. He spent three years working in the radio section of TBS, and now works for TBS TV. As the Evening News Director, he has taken a particular interest in producing programs that challenge what is perceived to be “common sense” by Japanese society. Kawakami is a graduate of Keio University’s Economics Department, where he received the Ozaki Yukio Memorial Fellowship.

    Charles Kupchan

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellows
    2002-2003

    Charles Kupchan is a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and Associate Professor of International Affairs at Georgetown University. After completing his BA in East Asian Studies from Harvard University and his PhD in Politics from Oxford University, he taught at Princeton University. He then went on to become a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and then Director for European Affairs on the National Security Council during President Clinton’s first term. Kupchan is the author of numerous books and articles on international affairs.

    Charles Lane

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Charles Lane is a Staff Writer on national affairs at The Washington Post, where he covers the Supreme Court. Prior to the Post, he was the Editor of The New Republic, a prominent weekly journal of political opinion. Before his appointment as Editor, he was a Senior Editor covering international affairs and national security issues. He served in a number of positions at Newsweek, including Bureau Chief in Berlin, General Editor and Central America Correspondent based in El Salvador. Lane has also published articles in Foreign Affairs, the Wall Street Journal and a number of other journals and newspapers. He is fluent in Spanish and speaks German. Lane received a Master of Studies in Law from Yale University and a BA from Harvard College.

    Read "A Secret Theater"

    Mary Lassen

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellowship
    2001-2002

    Mary Lassen is Executive Director of the Women's Educational and Industrial Union (WEIU), a 124-year-old Boston-based nonprofit organization founded to promote social, educational and economic opportunities for women. As a Fellow at the Mary I. Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College at Harvard University, she wrote "Community-Based Family Support in Public Housing".  Before coming to WEIU in 1994, she was Executive Director of the Committee for Boston Public Housing, Inc., an organization that works with public housing tenants to build community capacity. After graduating from Radcliffe College, Lassen spent five years organizing low- and moderate-income families in Arkansas, Missouri and Texas through the Association of Community Organizations for Reform NOW (ACORN).

    Read "A Promising Dilemma"

    Steven Levy

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2000-2001

    Steven Levy is Senior Editor at Newsweek Magazine. As a columnist and chief technology writer, he wrote columns for Rolling Stone, Popular Computing and Macworld and contributed articles to several magazines, including Esquire, The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine. He is the author of five books, including Crypto: How the Code Rebels Beat the Government--Saving Privacy in the Digital Age (2001), Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything (1994), and Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution (1984). Levy is a former Freedom Forum Media Studies Center Fellow and Clarion Award winner for best column.

    Micheline Maynard

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    Micheline Maynard is a freelance journalist whose work regularly appears in The New York Times, Fortune Magazine and The Toronto Globe & Mail. Her reporting focuses on manufacturing, corporate strategy and new technology, with a particular concentration on the auto industry. She was an Associate Editor for U.S. News & World Report, as well as Automotive Reporter and eventually Detroit Bureau Chief of USA Today. Maynard is the author of two books, The Global Manufacturing Vanguard: New Rules From the Industry Elite (1998) and Collision Course: Inside the Battle for General Motors (1995). She is also a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Michigan Business School, where she teaches an MBA course on the global auto industry. Maynard holds an MA in Journalism from Columbia University, where she was a Knight-Bagehot Fellow in Business and Economics Journalism. Maynard was also a 1999-2000 Michigan Journalism Fellow at the University of Michigan.

    Douglas McGray

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2000 - 2001

    Douglas McGray writes about social and political issues, international affairs, technology, and design. His work appears in such publications as The New York Times Magazine, Wired, Mother Jones, The Economist, Metropolis, The Washington Post Magazine, Fast Company, Daedalus, and Foreign Policy, where he is a contributing writer. His Foreign Policy essay "Japan's Gross National Cool," which also appeared in Chuo Koron, was the subject of a TIME Asia cover story and a profile in the "Year in Ideas" issue of The New York Times Magazine. Previously a features editor at Foreign Policy, McGray was an original architect of its transformation from a quarterly academic journal into an award-winning, bimonthly magazine. He has also appeared as a commentator on CNN International and NHK. McGray studied Intellectual History and International Affairs at Brown University. He was born in Maine, in 1975.

    Read "Japan's Gross National Cool"

    John McQuaid

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2000-2001

    John McQuaid is a Washington-based special projects reporter for the Times-Picayune, concentrating on science, politics and the environment. He was lead report on “Oceans of Trouble,” a series on global fisheries issues that won a Pulitzer Prize for public service in 1997. His work has also won national awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. McQuaid was Latin America correspondent for the Times-Picayune from 1989-1992 and covered the U.S. presidential elections of 1988 and 1992. McQuaid holds a BA in English from Yale University. 

    Read "A View of Religion in Japan"

    Michiko Nakamura

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Michiko Nakamura is a staff writer in the Science News Department at Asahi Shimbun, one of Japan’s largest newspapers. She has served as a staff writer or editor at the paper since 1989. Since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake in Japan in 1995, she has focused much of her attention on writing stories related to disasters resulting from natural causes, infectious diseases or acts of terrorism. She is a recipient of the Pharmacia & Upjohn Science Writer’s Award for a year-long series of articles on health information. Nakamura graduated from the University of Tokyo’s School of Medicine and received an MS in Health Science from its graduate school.

    Hiroyuki Nakano

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Hiroyuki Nakano covers politics and policy in Shiojori city, Nagana Prefecture, as a Staff Writer for The Shinano Mainichi daily newspaper. He wrote an 18-month series highlighting the new and growing importance of nonprofit organizations from April 2000 - October 2001, as Japanese nonprofit organizations have increasingly taken on responsibilities of providing social services previously handled by the government. The series resumed in October 2003, focusing on the challenges that NPOs face, including management, finance, and relationship-building with government and business. Nakano earned a BA in Geography from Indiana University of Pennsylvania after being influenced by a three-week experience in a high school exchange program in the U.S.

    Takao Norikoshi

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    Takao Norikoshi is a freelance dance critic and author. He contributes regularly to magazines and newspapers such as Dance Magazine and Asahi Shimbun. His next book will be published later this year and is based on a series of articles he wrote for Ballet magazine over a period of four years. He also the author of a number of books, including The Perfect Guide to Contemporary Dance, a guidebook to contemporary dance in Japan. Norikoshi's book, Dancing All Life: The History of Saburo Nakagawa, investigates entertainment in Japan before World War II.

    Clifford Pearson

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Clifford Pearson is senior editor at Architectural Record, a leading magazine on architecture for professionals worldwide. He is responsible for writing features and building stories, editing the Books and Critique departments, and coordinating coverage of Asia. He is also a freelance writer for other publications, including as The New York Times, The Washington Post and Travel & Leisure. He is the author of Indonesia: Design and Culture and the editor of Modern American Houses: Four Decades of Award-Winning Design in Architectural Record. Pearson has an MA in Architectural History from Columbia University and a BA in Urban Studies and Law from Cornell University.

    Read "Glimpses of Contemporary Japan"

    Daniel Pink

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2006

    Daniel H. Pink is the author of the acclaimed bestsellers A Whole New Mind and Free Agent Nation. A contributing editor at Wired magazine, he has written on work, business, and politics for The New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Slate, Salon, Fast Company and other publications. He also has lectured to corporations, universities and associations around the world on economic transformation and business strategy, and has analyzed commercial and social trends for dozens of television and radio programs. Prior to becoming a journalist and author, Pink served as chief speechwriter to Vice President Al Gore, an aide to U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich, and an economic policy staffer in the U.S. Senate.

    Read "Japan, Ink: Inside the Manga Industrial Complex" (PDF)


    David Plotz

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    David Plotz is the Washington Bureau Chief for Slate.com and a freelance writer whose work has appeared in Harper's Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone and The New Republic, among other publications. Prior to joining Slate, he worked as an Associate Editor and then as Senior Editor for the Washington City Paper, where he wrote feature stories about DC politics and society, as well as political columns. Plotz holds a BA in Social Studies from Harvard College, where he got his start in journalism working for the Harvard Crimson. Plotz received the National Press Club's Sandy Hume Award for Political Journalism (2000) for a Harper's article about South Carolina's video poker industry, and he was a finalist for the National Magazine Award for Public Service for the same article.

    Read "Pachinko Nation"

    Sheridan Prasso

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Sheridan Prasso is Senior News Editor at BusinessWeek, where she is editor of the UpFront section in the front of the magazine, and was previously the Asia Editor. She is considered a “non-Japan Asia specialist.” She was previously with Agence France-Presse, where she was the Cambodia bureau chief in Phnom Penh among other positions, and worked for the Associated Press. Her freelance work has appeared in The New Yorker, The Far Eastern Economic Review and other publications. Prasso received a BA from George Washington University in International Affairs and an M. Phil. from the University of Cambridge in Social Anthropology.

    Howard Rosen

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellow
    2002-2003

    Howard Rosen currently consults on U.S. Agency for International Development projects, advising foreign governments on a range of economic and trade issues, with a specialty in competitiveness and labor market policies. Legislation he drafted to reform and expand the Trade Adjustment Assistance program, which became a centerpiece of the Trade Promotion Authority bill, passed the U.S. Congress and was signed by President Bush in August 2002. His previous positions include Assistant Director and Research Associate at the Institute for International Economics; Minority Staff Director of the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress; and Executive Director of the Competitiveness Policy Council. Rosen received a BA and MA in Economics from George Washington University.

    Yoshihiko Saito

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    Yoshihiko Saito is a Staff Writer for the Foreign News Department of Mainichi Shimbun. Since he joined the newspaper's Okayama branch and learned about elder abuse in a nursing home there in 1989, he has mainly covered that topic as well as elder care and the social welfare system. He has won prizes for serial articles on elder abuse and scoops on euthanasia and organ transplantation. After studying Medical Ethics at Freiburg University (1997-98) and carrying out research there, he wrote two books on long-term care social insurance systems. Saito has a degree in Sociology from Hitotsubashi University.

    David Samuels

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    David Samuels is a contributing editor at Harper’s Magazine and a regular contributor to The New Yorker. He likes to write about people who lead double lives and about ordinary people who inhabit marginal worlds. Samuels was named one of 50 “Writers to Watch” by Editor and Publisher in 2000 and named one of the "Top 10 feature writers 35 and under in America" by the Columbia Journalism Review in 2002. Samuels received a BA in American History from Harvard College and a MA in American History from Princeton University, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the Humanities. Samuels currently serves as an advisory fellow to the Truman National Security Project in Washington.

    Read “Let’s Die Together”
    http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200705/group-suicide


    Jim Sciutto

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    Jim Sciutto is a Correspondent and Anchor for ABC News in Washington, DC. He first worked with ABC as a Correspondent in Chicago, where he covered the Midwest for affiliated TV stations. His news career began at "The Student Press," a weekly talk show in Montreal, and continued when he joined Asia Television in Hong Kong as Reporter. From there, he went to work with Asia Business News as a Hong Kong-based Correspondent, where he covered business and general news for the Singapore-based network. A Fulbright Fellowship prompted Sciutto to move to Hong Kong, where he studied press freedom prior to the British handover in 1997. Sciutto holds a BA from Yale University.

    Joshua Wolf Shenk

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2006

    Joshua Wolf Shenk is Director of Washington College's Rose O'Neill Literary House and is a creative writing instructor at the college well known for its Sophie Kerr Prize and literary culture. He has published essays and reviews in The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's Magazine, The New York Times and GQ, among many others, as well as in a national bestselling anthology, Unholy Ghost. A selection of his work can be found at www.shenk.net. His first book, Lincoln's Melancholy, was published by Houghton Mifflin and was named one of the best books of 2005 by The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Atlanta Journal Constitution. He has also served on the writing faculty at the New School University and at New York University. He has been recognized with fellowships at numerous writers' colonies and arts organizations, including the New York Foundation for the Arts, the Blue Mountain Center, Yaddo and MacDowell, and was a Scholar at the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and a Rosalynn Carter Fellow in Mental Health Journalism at the Carter Center. Shenk graduated from Harvard in 1994 with a BA in History and Literature.

    Madhulika Sikka

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2005

    Madhulika Sikka is a Senior Producer for "Nightline with Ted Koppel," an ABC News program working on both breaking news stories and feature pieces. She is responsible for all aspects of daily new broadcasts, including editorial decisions and production. She has worked for "Nightline" since 1992, first as a researcher and then as a producer. Prior to joining ABC News, she worked for World Monitor Television, CBS News and NBC News. Sikka received a BA from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies and an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development from Cambridge University.

    Alexandra Starr

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Alexandra Starr is the Chief Capital Hill Correspondent for Business Week, covering policy and political trends. Prior beats include the White House and social policy. She has also worked at a number of other media outlets, including The Washington Monthly, National Public Radio and Bloomberg Business News. She is fluent in Spanish and speaks French. Starr received an MA in Political Science from La Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela) and a BA from the University of Virginia.

    Chris Steineger

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellowship
    2001-2002

    Chris Steineger is a member of the Kansas State Senate. During his two terms, he has served on the Commerce, Public Health & Welfare, Financial Institutions & Insurance and Administrative Rules & Regulations Committees, among others. Prior to his election in 1997, Steineger was Special Projects Director at the Contractor Tax Discovery Unit of the Kansas Department of Revenue and Development Director at Cross-Lines Cooperative Council, Inc., a nonprofit poverty assistance agency. He also was Field Director for Dennis Moore's successful 1998 congressional campaign. Steineger holds a BS from Kansas State University and an MA from the University of Kansas.

    Seth Stevenson

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2002-2003

    Seth Stevenson is a freelance writer who has had articles published in The New York Times Magazine, Details, and Rolling Stone, and online in Slate, The New Republic Online and MSNBC.com, among others. Prior to working freelance, Stevenson was an editor at Newsweek and Slate, where he both wrote articles and worked as an editor. Stevenson has a BA in English and Philosophy from Brown University.

    Brad Stone

    United States-Japan Media Fellow
    2006

    Brad Stone, based in San Francisco for The New York Times, is a business and technology journalist with experience covering a wide range of topics, from the Timothy McVeigh trial to the boom, bust and subsequent rebirth of the high-tech economy. Previously, he was a Silicon Valley Correspondent and Columnist for Newsweek magazine, where he was the author of a biweekly column on Newsweek's website, "Plain Text," expressing his own views on digital life and interpretations of news from the technology world. As a freelance writer, Stone has contributed recent articles on Internet phone services such as Skype, and on Google's aggressive hiring practices, to Wired magazine. Stone also authored the book, Gearheads: The Turbulent Rise of Robotic Sports.  The book, which investigates the birth of robot competitions around the world, was named to the prestigious Booksense 76 list, and was chosen among the 100 best books of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle. Stone graduated cum laude with a BA in English from Columbia University.

    Elizabeth Sturcken

    Japan Society Local Government and Public Policy Fellow
    2002-2003

    Elizabeth Sturcken is a Project Manager for the Alliance for Environmental Innovation, a project of Environmental Defense. Her primary responsibility is to manage business-environment partnerships that benefit both business and the environment. She is currently working with Federal Express to purchase delivery trucks that emit 90% less pollutants and are 50% more fuel efficient. Sturcken has worked at a number of environmental organizations and serves on the boards of several environmental groups. Sturcken is a graduate of the University of Minnesota and Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

    Kara Swisher

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    Kara Swisher is a Technology Columnist in the San Francisco Bureau of The Wall Street Journal where she writes a weekly column called "Boom Town." She began her journalism career as Associate Editor at the Washington City Paper, a weekly alternative newspaper in Washington, DC. She joined the McLaughlin Group in 1986 as a writer and researcher. Swisher also spent 10 years at the Washington Post where she wrote the column, "Artsbeat." She became a reporter for the Post's Business section in 1989 and covered retail, workplace and technology, including America Online Inc. She is also the author of aol.com: How Steve Case Beat Bill Gates, Nailed the Netheads and Made Millions in the War for the Web (Random House/Times Business Books, 1998). In 1999, she was selected as "the Internet Economy's most influential journalist," by the Industry Standard. Swisher holds a BS from Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and an MA from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

    Margaret Talbot

    United States-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2003-2004

    Margaret Talbot is a Staff Writer for The New Yorker and a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, a public policy institute. Prior to joining The New Yorker, she was a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine, where her articles were regularly the featured cover story. She has also contributed articles to a range of publications, including The Atlantic Monthly, The National Geographic and The New Republic, where she was a Senior Editor. Talbot received an MA in European History from Harvard University and a BA from the University of California, Berkeley.

    Takeshi Tanikawa

    U.S.-Japan Foundation Media Fellows Program
    2001-2002

    Takeshi Tanikawa is a freelance cinema journalist who also works at Senshu University in Kanagawa as a part-time lecturer of English. After he graduated from Chuo University in 1985 with a BA in Political Science, he joined Nippon Herald Film Co. and worked there for 8 years. Since leaving the film company, he has plied between academia and journalism, getting an MA in Cultural Science from Saitama University (1997), where his thesis won the First Kyoto Film Culture Award; earning a PhD in Sociology from Hitotsubashi University (2001); and publishing several books, including The Legend of "Easy Rider" (1996) and Visiting Leonardo DiCaprio (1999). Under a 1999-2000 Fulbright Scholarship at Columbia University, Tanikawa worked on his dissertation: "U.S. Film Policy Toward Occupied Japan".

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